Tag Archives: essays

June 2017 Wrapup: Part II

21 Jul

[Note: I apologize for how terribly late these post are! I have had a hectic month and am working hard to catch up. July Part I should be up very soon!]

The second half of June was a lot like the first: many thrillers and fast reads. I was traveling quite a bit in June and needed easy books I could dip in and out of without being confused. It actually ended up being a decent reading month with 19 books in total. Far from my best, but also far from my worst!

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Concomitance, by Monica McClure. Finished June 15th. This short but impactful poetry collection tells the story of what it is to be a woman in a commercial society. Each poem features a different event in the author’s life, but it is told through the lens of what beauty products and clothing brands she wore during that time. This is probably something most women in America can identify with: I think we can all instantly think of “that Valentine’s day I wore the purple MAC lipstick” or “my super cute Forever 21 top that I always wear to amusement parks.”

It is, of course, a symptom of capitalism and the appearance-based culture most women are a part of, willingly or not. While this is on the surface an almost superficial look at the author’s life, it’s also a pretty biting commentary on modern society. It’s dry and self-deprecating, simply written but with many moving lines. If you like poetry and feminist critiques I would definitely give this a shot.

Lipstick Rating 4 Full

 

 

 

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Final Girls, by Mira Grant*. Finished June 16th. I would consider myself a low-key fan of Mira Grant/Seanan McGuire. I have enjoyed everything of hers that I’ve read, even if some have been far more successful than others. They still always end up being fun horror romps, especially when she writes as Mira Grant.

Final Girls is no different. This novella is about a near-future where virtual reality technology has been harnessed to help people overcome trauma. People are put into a totally immersive horror-movie-esque experience that will either help them get past their history or bond with a person they are estranged from. Our main girl, Esther, is a journalist who doubts both the effectiveness and the ethics of this treatment. During her tour of the facility, she’s offered a little horror movie experience of her own, and is joined by the project’s mastermind, Dr. Jennifer Webb.

The majority of this story is about Esther and Jennifer in the VR machine, bonding in a cheesy teenage horror movie. It’s cute and very meta, with all those tropes we all love to hate on full display. But of course things don’t go as expected: just look at that cover. The turns it took weren’t totally unexpected, but this was a total blast of a read. I almost wish I’d saved it for Halloween, this would be such a good cold-weather spooky read.

Lipstick Rating 3 And 1 Half

 

 

 

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The Marsh King’s Daughter, by Karen Dionne. Finished June 17th. I have bad luck with popular thrillers, especially when I read hyped ones right at release. And while I got hit by the “why am I reading this” blues later in the month, The Marsh King’s Daughter actually lived up to the hype (mostly). I do think the comparisons to Room are very misleading: aside from having one thing in common (a child born to a captured mother), they are very different. Room is a slow-burn piece of literary fiction, and this is a fast-paced thriller based on revenge.

Helena was born thinking her life was normal, even though her father had kidnapped her mother and held her captive for over a decade. Neither of them told Helena this (we assume because they both, for different reasons, wanted her to have as normal a childhood as possible), and it was only after a traumatic event that she escaped & realized what her life had been. We flip back and forth between past-Helena as a child and current-Helena, who has formed a life with a man who has no idea about her past. Her father escapes from prison and Helena knows he will come after her (and her two daughters).

This is a tense thriller, one of the few in the genre that manages to have all the thriller elements I want: rapid-fire pace, a decent plot, good twists and turns, interesting characters, and a satisfactory ending. Of course this is a dark book, with many scenes in Helena’s past that are quite disturbing when you know what is really going on, so if you are sensitive to child abuse or rape this probably isn’t the book for you. But if you want a thriller that actually delivers on its promises, definitely check this out.

Lipstick Rating 4 Full

 

 

 

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The Hike, by Drew Magary. Finished June 18th. There are few words that would describe how bizarre and magical this book is. See all that weird shit on the cover? Winged vampires, bloody swans, men in dog masks wrestling, boats, a smoke monster, a conquistador, etc. All of those things are in The Hike. Along with all the weirdos on the back cover, as well.

The Hike plays with the line between fantasy, surrealism, magical realism, and bizarro. It would technically fit in any of those genres, but I think it belongs in a space of its own. It’s violent, hilarious, slapstick comedy-horror at its absolute best.

Until the very end this was a solid 4-star book for me but the ending is just mindblowing and amazing. And surprisingly emotional, given how overall goofy this novel is. The end is suddenly serious and hard-hitting, but in a way that totally fits with the rest of the book. Highly recommend this one!

Lipstick Rating 4 And 1 Half

 

 

 

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The Last Place You Look, by Kristen Lepionka. Finished June 18th. This is a mystery novel that could so easily go into cheesy trope territory. On paper, the main character sounds like a walking mishmash of every detective novel: her father was a cop, she’s a private detective, she inherited a lot of his issues (including a drinking problem), she sleeps around and stays out too late. But somehow, Roxane Weary stands head and shoulders above almost every other detective I’ve read about. She is just amazingly complex: headstrong but emotionally sensitive, openly bisexual, determined, willing to make mistakes. Roxane is just wonderfully human.

To go along with the great main character (who is getting a whole series, of which this is the first) there is a great mystery. We get the past-present mystery overlap which seems to popular recently, except in this case the past mystery is “solved:” Roxane is actually hired by the sister of a man on death row for murder. Said sister insists that she saw one of the victims walking around alive and well.

This case ends up connected to both a bunch of cold cases and a ongoing case, and Roxane is stuck in the middle. This is a satisfying mystery that falls into a more traditional “putting the pieces together” model than the current “endless twists and wham moments” that I am growing rather tired of. I am very, very picky about the detective/mystery genre: I want great characters, interesting writing, a good mystery, and a solid conclusion. And, as you can tell by the rating, The Last Place You Look hit every mark for me. Definitely going to read anything this author writes in the future!

Lipstick Rating 4 Full

 

 

 

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Foxlowe, by Eleanor Wasserberg. Finished June 20th. This book has many elements that I usually love, but I feel that the amazing premise was burdened by an overly childish narrative. This book is about children in a cult/commune, and having horrible events be seen through childish eyes can certainly be done well (Hurt People, We Have Always Lived in the Castle, Room) but here it feels a little too washed-out. This might be because there is little depth to the cult at Foxlowe.

There are strange pagan elements to their life and it seems a commune-turned-bad type situation, but there is never enough context. Why are all of these adults totally fine with the child abuse that goes on, especially since for many of them it’s their own child being abused? Why do they worship the Solstices so fervently? What is the cult leader Freya telling them to make them trust her so implicitly? What are the details of their beliefs? It’s kind of a head-scratching situation. And the lack of details made many of the plot details nonsensical.

There are some very cool elements at work here, but they never seem to come together. Possibly because we cut away from Foxlowe just when we start to get some answers, which is incredibly frustrating (and adult Green is an annoying, unpleasant narrator). Green is a very traumatized person, but she’s almost unbearable by the middle of the book. The reader is given little reason to feel bad for her, since she has such a flat affect as a child and then immediately turns into a bitter trainwreck. I did enjoy Foxlowe, but at the end I was really left thinking about what could have been with a little more time & polish.

Lipstick Rating 3 Full

 

 

 

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The Party, by Robyn Harding. Finished June 21st. This light, fluffy book is exactly what you’d expect from the blurb and cover: Liane Moriarty light. 2.5 seems like a low rating but I didn’t hate it. It was mindless fun, which sometimes you need, but not particularly well-executed mindless fun. I have very few feelings about this one way or the other and not much to say about it. All the characters are terrible but the plot is interesting, though it never really delivers on the wham-moment reveal you are expecting. The drama is a bit trite and everyone acts like a moron, but the writing is solid and the pacing is excellent. Probably a really good beach read.

Lipstick Rating 2 And 1 Half

 

 

 

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Sunshine State, by Sarah Gerard. Finished June 21st. While I enjoyed this book of essays, it was really a mixed bag for me. I adore Sarah Gerard’s writing: it is biting and luminous and dark and funny, and her novel Binary Star swept me away. I wanted more of that style from this collection than what I ended up with.

Her personal essays, like “BFF” or “Rabbit,” are beautiful and touching. We get dark little peeks into her childhood and teen years that felt raw and brimming with emotion. And her journalistic essays about other concepts, like the magical “Sunshine State” that focuses on an animal hoarder in charge of a wildlife sanctuary, are just as amazing (though in a totally different way, of course–Gerard does a great job at making these far-away events seem intense and personal).

But many here fall in the middle, like “Going Diamond” and “Mother-Father God.” These essays focus on personal events (like her parents’ involvement in Christian Science and Amway) but alternate between her own history and the history of the church/company. Since her writing on these topics when separate is so good I really expected the combination to be magical, but it was so lacking. I found the constant back-and-forth made her writing come off as dry and distanced.

I still gave this 4 stars because I found many of the essays memorable and beautiful, but it was so wildly inconsistent. Especially because a lot of the half-personal-half-journalism essays were all grouped together, and it was hard for me to power through all of them.

Lipstick Rating 4 Full

 

 

 

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Katherine of Aragon: The True Queen, by Alison Weir. Finished June 26th. Katherine of Aragon is absolutely my favorite of Henry’s queens. She was such an amazing woman, and I often wonder what history would have been like if she had been allowed to rule. It would have been some good times for England, guys. A lot less wife murder too.

I have never read any Weir before this book, and I’m not yet sold on her as the queen of historical fiction. I enjoyed this book, but I felt like she made Katherine WAY more passive than she was in reality. It was really frustrating: she is portrayed as a bystander in her own life for the first 40% or so. She grows a spine and is far more the Katherine I love in the second half, but this was only after Anne entered the scene. I think Katherine was a great, fierce woman way before then.

Of course that is a personal quibble based on my own perception of these historical figures. The writing was great and I think the pacing was excellent (even if we do skim over some important events), so I will be reading the rest of the 5 books in this series. One for each wife!

Lipstick Rating 3 And 1 Half

 

 

 

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See What I Have Done, by Sarah Schmidt*. Finished June 28th. This book is the love child of His Bloody Project and We Have Always Lived in the Castle. It is a historical mystery/thriller based on the infamous Lizzy Borden case, where a girl killed both her father and stepmother with an axe in a sensationally violent fashion. This is a story that has held on to its intrigue throughout the decades, because what possibly could have been her motive? What was going on in that house to cause such a violent reaction? Or was Lizzy just crazy?

We have multiple points of view here: Lizzy herself, Lizzy’s sister Emma, their maid Bridget, and a strange man who may or may not have had something to do with the crime. They alternate pretty consistently, but because of this we got a lot less of Lizzy than what I wanted. I mean, she is at the core of this, so I really wish we had gotten less POVs or a longer story to flesh Lizzy out a bit more as a character.

I feel like my thoughts when reading this were, “this was good, but I wish Schmidt had done x a little differently.” I don’t think this book pushed its story far enough. There are a lot of horrible and bizarre things happening in the Borden house, but it felt like Schmidt shied away from the darker potential she’d built and went for the strange and baffling instead. I wanted the vibe to be darker, creepier, more disturbing. It actually was all of those things, but not as much as you’d be expecting in a story of gristly murder.

The strength of this novel is the writing. It’s flighty and whimsical, especially when we are in Lizzy’s head. There is a strange, airy surrealness here that makes it feel like a fairy tale. When the moments of violence come, they have a particularly dark impact. It also builds suspense fantastically: because of all the shifting narratives we will often know about a core event before the characters it will affect the most, and the buildup to that confrontation actually happening is so tense it’s almost unbearable. It’s one of those books where you know something terrible is going to happen, but you just want to get it over with to break that layer of anxiety.

Lipstick Rating 3 And 1 Half

 

 

 

Reading Challenge Goals

Books Read: 109/200

Goal Books: 102

Impulse Reads: 7

[Books marked with a * were provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review, all opinions are my own]

August 2016 Reading Wrapup: Part III

5 Sep

August was definitely one of my best reading months ever. I got a ton done, both in terms of numbers and goals! I’d been putting off my series challenge for a while but I finally got back into that (though I think I’ll be modifying it a bit before the end of the year), and I decided to pick up Book Riot’s Read Harder challenge (since I’d already completed 80% of the challenges anyway). I’m pumped for September!

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So Sad Today, by Melissa Broder. Finished August 19th. After reading and loving Broder’s Last Sext earlier this year, I wanted to devour basically everything she’s written. Starting with her book of essays! Something about her just speaks to my very soul. It’s strange, because while we share some of the same issues (depression, anxiety) I don’t think her actual life is even remotely like mine. And some of the topics she covers (open marriage, vomit fetish…) are so far out of my experience or comfort zone. Yet in every essay, no matter how foreign the topic, she writes something I can connect to.

It’s like she has a hotline to all that darkness in your soul. She can reach in and say something so personal you’d swear it was written about you, or for you. And realizing that these terrible thoughts are actually near-universal for depressed people is oddly freeing. Like, if this famous and successful person feels this way, maybe I’m not as abnormal as I thought? Also, she’s a brilliant, funny, beautiful writer. Pretty sure Melissa Broder is my spirit animal.

Lipstick Rating5 Full

 

 

 

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The Ferryman Institute, by Colin Gigl*. Finished August 20th. I was really excited for this book, but I think I led myself to believe it was something it just isn’t. I was expecting a slow, thoughtful, dark fantasy about Ferrymen who help dead souls pass over. And while the last part is true, it’s more an action-comedy fantasy. And that’s not a genre I usually go for at all, so I mostly blame myself for how much I disliked The Ferryman Institute (though there is one problematic element I just can’t get over).

If you want a weird/quirky action movie in a book format, this delivers like crazy. It’s nonstop action: car chases, dramatic escapes, backstabbing, twists and turns. The worldbuilding and character development really takes a backseat to the rapid-fire pace. I wanted a LOT more information about the Ferrymen, more background stuff about the characters, and less car chases. But that’s not really the book’s fault, is it? That was just my expectation.

For the most part, it’s just that it wasn’t the book for me. BUT. There’s one kind of huge flaw. The premise is that one of the Ferrymen decides to save a suicidal girl instead of waiting for her to die. The girl, Alice, is depressed, has OCD (well… she shows no signs of OCD but we’re told she has it), and suffers from anorexia and is underweight. Problem one with this: our Ferryman, Charlie, is attracted to her right away. Which, given that she’s sick and underweight, is squicky for me personally. Two: Alice “gets better” over the course of the book because of Charlie. Let’s get this straight: boys do not save girls from depression. A knight in shining armor does not cure mental illness. I just think it’s really irresponsible to present their ~romance~ as saving Alice. Therapy, medication, and self-reflection help depression. Not ~true love~. So, while I want to be like, “oh I just didn’t like this book because I’m not action-oriented” I feel like this is SUCH a huge problem and a really big personal pet peeve of mine.

Lipstick Rating 2 Full

 

 

 

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Stranded, by Bracken MacLeod*. Finished August 20th. If a book is compared to The Thing/At The Mountains of Madness I am going to read it. I had great success earlier this year with The Thing Itself, and while this is totally different in basically every way it was also pretty fantastic.

There are a lot of twists and turns in this book, and at its core it’s really a science fiction mystery, so I really don’t want to discuss the plot much. The basics: a ship sent out to refuel an oil rig gets iced in during a huge storm, and the crew starts getting sick. Very, strangely sick: the kind of sick where you see shadows dancing in the corners of your eyes. The first half of this book has an intensely creepy and claustrophobic vibe: it’s a scenario where tensions will obviously be high, and there’s a sense of dread lingering in the background.

While it’s not really a horror, it’s definitely an unsettling and at times downright scary book. The plot is tightly crafted and it’s clear how everything fits together when you get to the end. The characters are messy and human, but they address their flaws in very interesting ways. There was a moment where I thought, “what the hell, protagonist??” that was actually addressed later in the story! Which basically never happens, so I was pretty happy about that. In a way, this reminded me of Blake Crouch’s Dark Matter: not in theme or topic at all, but in the way it starts off as a simple but interesting story that builds to an amazing and unexpected conclusion.

Lipstick Rating 3 And 1 Half

 

 

 

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A Desolate Splendor, by John Jantunen*. Finished August 22nd. This is a beautiful book, but I found the description incredibly misleading. Yes, this is a post-apocalyptic novel about survival in the aftermath of disaster. But the end of the world event is basically set dressing: there are many clues that this is the future but there is almost no information about what happened (or why). This isn’t a negative at all, and it adds a lot of atmosphere, but the blurb gives a very precise summary of events that… well… don’t really occur. The two “sets” of bad guys (Reds and Echoes) are not described as being ex-soliders or a weird death cult. The reader is given descriptions of them and their actions, but is really left to draw their own conclusion about motivations and background.

It’s a style of writing I really like: we’re thrown into this survival situation with no information, and have to find our own footing. The narrative is very colloquial in style: many characters aren’t even given names (for example, we have ‘the boy’ and ‘Pa’), and there are no quotation marks during dialogue. And while that, along with the father/son dynamic and setting, may draw comparisons to The Road, they’re wildly different books. A Desolate Splendor has several overlapping character groups, and we switch between them quite frequently. Some have names, some don’t. We get inside the head of some, and are left in the dark about others. The story flits rapidly between plot points and it really takes a while to figure out how any of these stories are connected, but they come together beautifully.

This is the type of book for people who like raw, gritty survival takes. It’s a dark book, with a lot of violence, but none of it is ever gratuitous. We’re shown how desolate and scary the world has become, but perhaps more frighteningly we see how easily humans adapt to this cruelty. There’s not an ounce of telling in this book: character motivations, histories, and even some key plot events are left for the reader to deduce themselves. It’s not a book that holds your hand or offers even an ounce of help, and I loved that. I’d go back and carefully re-read paragraphs to pick up on any hints I missed, and it was so satisfying when I felt like I ‘solved’ something myself. Recommended if you want an apocalyptic tale that feels like grit-lit.

Lipstick Rating 4 Full

 

 

 

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All The Ugly and Wonderful Things, by Bryn Greenwood. Finished August 23rd. Sometimes, very rarely, a book will function exactly like an author intends it to. Usually they’re in the ballpark though: a sad book will make you emotional, a scary book will have you checking under the bed. But once in a rare while, a book will be 100% different from what an author intended (like The Dinner). Given the ending here, I think Greenwood’s intent was indeed to show us an “unusual and provocative love story” or whatever else the blurb says. But it doesn’t ask “hard questions” because newsflash: sexually abusing a child is always wrong.

This is not a love story. This is a story of a very damaged young girl who is taken in and groomed by an adult man who enters into a sexual relationship with her when she’s 13 years old. Let’s get one thing straight: a 13-year-old cannot consent to sex with a man ten years older than her. She can think she’s in love, that she wasn’t groomed and it’s totally her choice (or his choice–older woman/male child is just as revolting), but the grownup is responsible here. The grownup is the one who has to say no. Children do not have the emotional capacity to understand romance and sex with an adult.

In terms of showing how twisted the relationship between Kellen and Wavy is, this book actually does a fantastic job. I’m not sure it means to: I think it’s meant to make us uncomfortable but also have us “root for them.” But every scene between them, especially the ones in Kellen’s head, are disgusting. He admits that he fell in love with her when she was 8. He crawls in her bed in the middle of the night before she hits puberty. He goes on and on about her “perfect small tits.” It’s…. just really unsettling. Like in the books that came before it (Lolita, The End of Alice, Tampa, Lamb–all of which handle this topic SO MUCH BETTER) it’s clear that these are the thoughts of a disturbed person. And Wavy’s perspective is equally heartbreaking: she is SO CONVINCED that she loves her abuser. Poor Wavy. I think she really does love him, because she grew up with no love and Kellen has treated her “better” than anyone else. It’s all she thinks she deserves.

I think what people are missing here when they call it a “love story” is that you can abuse someone while thinking you love them. Read interviews with convicted pedophiles–many of them legitimately think the 5-year-old loved them and “wanted it.” This doesn’t mean it’s right, obviously. Kellen really thinks he loves Wavy, and he wants the best for her. Of course he damages her and ruins her life, but he thinks he is doing the right thing. Wavy and Kellen’s relationship is in no way a love story, so I’m super confused by some of the reviews. It is a beautifully written book, but I’m just… I don’t know how to feel about it given the “love story” tone and also the fact that the author’s past mirrors Wavy’s in several ways.

Lipstick Rating 2 Full

 

 

 

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Black Fairy Tale, by Otsuichi*. Finished August 26th. I read ZOO by Otsuichi earlier this year and absolutely loved it, so I will admit I had pretty high expectations coming into Black Fairy Tale. While I didn’t love it quite as much as ZOO, I think it actually exceeded my expectations!

Unlike ZOO, this is a novel. However, it does in some ways have the feel of a short story collection. There are numerous layers here, and the first one we’re introduced to is a straight-up fairy tale about a raven collecting eyeballs for a blind girl so she can experience what they’ve seen. This story is actually written by a character in the book, and we have their perspective along with the perspective of a girl who lost her eye and after getting a transplant is experiencing memories from the eye’s “original” owner. These three aspects are spliced together in a very interesting way: there are obvious plot connections between the storylines, but there’s also some very clever mirroring between the “story world” and the “real world.” I was really impressed with how everything came together in the end, and the plot definitely went in some unexpected directions.

This book is definitely not for the faint of heart. It is intensely gruesome and there is a LOT of body horror (think Franken Fran in book format). The violence is shocking: not because it’s upsetting or gratuitous (Otsuichi’s writing never feels like torture porn and there’s no sexual elements), but because it’s so bizarre and almost… whimsical? These absolutely horrific things happen but it’s just so very strange and surreal in both tone and content. There’s definitely elements of magical realism at play, giving it a very different feeling than other intense/graphic horror novels I’ve read. In this way it’s very like ZOO, which had that strange “this is so horrible yet reading it is so pleasant” kind of vibe.

If you like Japanese horror I think Otsuichi is a must-read, and he’s quickly become my favorite author in the genre. Interesting plotlines, bizarre and original concepts, and sparse but lovely writing.

Lipstick Rating 4 And 1 Half

 

 

 

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The Schooldays of Jesus, by J. M. Coetzee.  Finished August 27th. The last book in my Man Booker bonanza! And, sadly, one of my least favorites (though I am certain it will make the shortlist). I had very high expectations for this: Coetzee has won the Man Booker twice, the title is gorgeous, and the plot summary sounded very interesting.

And indeed, the “main character” David is very interesting. One of the best child characters I’ve ever read: he’s a strange, affected little kid but I loved his portrayal. All of my highlighted quotes are from him. Sadly, it’s clear from early on that while the book title is about David and the summary focuses on him, his fake father Simon is the main character. And Simon is…. boring. Very boring.

I found the plot unbearably boring and, to be honest, pretentious. There’s a lot of discussions about the ~morality~ of murder and like… I don’t really care about what happens to someone who rapes and murders a woman he’s obsessed with? I don’t want to read page after page of a judge brooding over justice and morality and what is right. How did this book turn into a courtroom drama?? This is not what I signed up for. I want to know how David calls down number with his dance, goddamit.

I also found the writing very affected. Simon’s name is repeated ad nauseam to the point that it’s tedious to read sections focused on him (which is basically all of them). Nobody talked like real people: it felt like some kind of weird morality tale.

Lipstick Rating 2 And 1 Half

 

 

 

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The Dragon Keeper, by Robin Hobb. Finished August 30th. I was pleasantly surprised by The Dragon Keeper. It seems like every review boils down to “good, but not as good as Fitz/Liveship.” So I really wasn’t expecting to love it. And while, yes, it’s not quite as magical as some of her other books, it still gave me those cozy Elderling-world feelings. As always, the characters are the star here: I love and hate the cast in equal measures already, and I’m constantly flip-flopping on how I feel about certain people (*cough*Seldrin*cough*).

This definitely feels like the first book in a series. To be honest, not a ton happens in 500 pages: I was kind of expecting the whole “dragon journey up the river” to take up most of the plot but they don’t even leave until the last 50 or so pages! I mean, it’s Hobb so I’m perfectly fine reading 450 pages of character building and plot setup, but it does feel particularly slow. I can see why people don’t like it as much as the others but personally, I loved this and can’t wait to start the next one!

Lipstick Rating 4 Full

 

 

 

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The Language of Dying, by Sarah Pinborough*. Finished August 31st. This slim little book about a woman whose father is dying packs an emotional punch. I hesitate to make this comparison because A Monster Calls is one of my all-time favorite books, but there are some obvious parallels I’d be silly to not point out. Both have a similar visual aesthetic, they’re both about dealing with dying, they’re quietly poetic, and both have a supernatural overtone (though The Language of Dying‘s is much more subtle).

I think this is one of those books where if you read it at the right moment in your life (like, say, when a family member is dying) it will have a huge, unforgettable emotional impact. I’ve had some book experiences like that (I read The Fault in Our Stars a few months after my uncle died of cancer, and A Monster Calls right after my neighbor died–also of cancer, which is what the illness in this book is too. Fuck cancer). And I think this could easily be a “coping with death” book for a lot of people.

The writing is soft and unassuming, but lovely. It flows beautifully and is just so easy to read, even when the subject matter is distressing. And while it’s a short book, Pinborough does a great job of showing us the cast of characters and we get to know them in a very short amount of time. I have a few other books of hers on my Kindle, and I am definitely bumping them up my TBR!

Lipstick Rating 3 And 1 Half

 

 

 

Reading Challenge Goals

197/175 Books

21/35 Series Books

56/50 TBR Books

22/15 Different Countries

[books marked with a * were provided by netgalley in exchange for an honest review, all opinions are my own]